Complex Systems in Finance and Econometrics

2011 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers (Editor-in-Chief)

System Dynamics, Analytical Methods for Structural Dominance, Analysis in

  • Christian Erik Kampmann
  • Rogelio Oliva
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7701-4_46

Article Outline

Glossary

Definition of the Subject

Introduction

Characterizing Linear and Nonlinear Systems

Traditional Control Theory Approaches

Pathway Participation Metrics

Eigenvalue Elasticity Analysis

Eigenvectors and Dynamic Decomposition Weights (DDW)

Future Directions

Bibliography

Keywords

Feedback Loop Behavior Mode System Dynamic Model Linear System Theory Dominant Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Erik Kampmann
    • 1
  • Rogelio Oliva
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Innovation and Organizational EconomicsCopenhagen Business SchoolCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Mays Business SchoolTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA