Encyclopedia of Applied Electrochemistry

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerhard Kreysa, Ken-ichiro Ota, Robert F. Savinell

Lithium Solid Cathode Batteries

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6996-5_380

Introduction

Several types of primary batteries have been developed that use lithium-metal anodes and solid cathodes. This entry reviews the more common commercial systems, namely Li-FeS2, Li-MnO2, and Li-CFx. Readers are referred to the relevant sections for information on Li-V2O5 and Li-Ag2V4O11 cells that are used for reserve and medical battery applications, respectively. There has been a wide range of cathodes developed in the laboratory and also marketed for specialty applications [1], but most have never been produced commercially. (Li-CuO cells were made for some military applications [2], but production was discontinued in the mid-1990s). Before going into details on the aforementioned three types mostly used in consumer applications, we will cover the main characteristics that they have in common.

General Attributes

The general characteristics of cells using lithium-metal anodes and solid cathodes are as follows:
  • Extremely high energy density and especially specific energy,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.TechnologyEnergizer Battery Manufacturing Inc.WestlakeUSA