Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

2013 Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Nonverbal Intelligence

  • Emily S. KuschnerEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_354

Definition

Nonverbal intelligence describes thinking skills and problem-solving abilities that do not fundamentally require verbal language production and comprehension. This type of intelligence involves manipulating or problem solving about visual information and may vary in the amount of internalized, abstract, or conceptual reasoning and motor skills that are required to complete a task. Nonverbal intelligence is often closely linked with the Performance IQ domain of intellectual ability tests that evaluates nonverbal abilities, a domain which is often viewed in comparison to the Verbal IQ domain.

Historical Background

The earliest intelligence tests developed in the mid- to late-1800s primarily measured sensory and motor abilities rather than conceptual or language abilities. However, the introduction of the 1905 Binet-Simon Scale and factor analytic theories of intelligence brought a wave of new perspectives on intelligence testing, separating out visual...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Division of NeuropsychologyChildren’s National Medical CenterWashingtonUSA