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Ecological Model of Autism

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Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders
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Definition

The ecological model of autism studies the behavior of individuals with autism within the context of many levels of environmental influence and assumes bidirectional influences between (a) the person and these environmental influences and (b) the many environmental levels. Context refers to the wide range of system levels that influence individuals with autism, including the immediate responses of caregivers and family, school, local community, as well as broader cultural, economic, and political practices. Some variables have a direct immediate impact, and some more distal variables have an indirect impact. With the ecological model, the appropriate unit of study is the interaction of the environment and individual, the organism-environment system; “autism is not a static condition existing within a person, but a developmental process that can only be understood as taking place through the interaction of person and environment” (Loveland, 2001, p. 22). An essential element...

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Correspondence to Jeffrey Danforth Ph.D. .

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Danforth, J. (2013). Ecological Model of Autism. In: Volkmar, F.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_1456

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_1456

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4419-1697-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4419-1698-3

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