Encyclopedia of Adolescence

2011 Edition
| Editors: Roger J. R. Levesque

Tobacco Use

  • Sherill V. C. MorrisEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1695-2_275

Overview

This essay provides an introduction to tobacco use among adolescents. It begins with a definition of adolescent smoking and a review of the focus of research on the issue of tobacco use. Tobacco smoking is the practice where tobacco is burned and the vapors either tasted or inhaled. Smoking is the most common method of consuming tobacco, and tobacco is the most common substance smoked. The tobacco is often mixed with other additives and then pyrolyzed. The resulting vapors are then inhaled and the active substances absorbed through the alveoli in the lungs.

The two broad categories of tobacco products are identified and their respective types discussed with the estimated proportion of US children using tobacco products identified. The link between tobacco use and cancer, especially lung cancer, and other diseases are identified and discussed. Evidence shows that many smokers begin during adolescence or early adulthood and continue through adulthood. During the early stages,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Justice StudiesPrairie View A&M UniversityPrairie ViewUSA