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Adaptive Game-Based Learning

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Synonyms

Adaptive instruction; Artificial intelligence; Cognitive modeling; Gaming; Learner supports; Scaffolding

Definitions

Shute and Zapata-Rivera (2008) define adaptive learning systems as hard and soft technologies that adjust content presented to the learner using methodologies such as cognitive modeling and/or sensory input. Commercial games generate optimal challenge and engagement levels through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) systems that make adjustments to the game based on player behavior. Game-based learning (GBL) has the potential to provide effective learning experiences for players by including adaptive strategies for learning and engagement outcomes. The rationale for GBL has roots in long-standing learning theories such as intrinsic motivation (Malone and Lepper 1987), play theory (Rieber 1996), and problem solving (Jonassen 1997). While the concept of GBL is not new, advances in technologies that facilitate programming and dissemination of digital games...

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Correspondence to Amy Adcock .

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Adcock, A., Van Eck, R. (2012). Adaptive Game-Based Learning. In: Seel, N.M. (eds) Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_4

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