Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science

2013 Edition
| Editors: Saul I. Gass, Michael C. Fu

Practice of Operations Research and Management Science

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1153-7_782

Introduction

The practice of OR/MS here will mean using the appropriate models, tools, techniques, and craft skills of these sciences to understand the problems of people/machine/nature systems with a view toward ameliorating these problems, possibly by new understandings, new decisions, new procedures, new structures, or new policies. Such practice calls for a suitable form of professionalism in dealing not only with the phenomena of the problem situation but also with the persons with relevant responsibilities, as well as other parties at interest.

OR/MS as a Science

Following Ravetz ( 1971), science in general may be described as “craft work operating on intellectually constructed objects,” each object defining a class. Scientific work is thus aimed at establishing new properties of these objects and verifying that they reflect the reality of the classes of phenomena that they represent (Miser 1993). This description has four implications:
  1. 1.

    The intellectual objects – that OR/MS...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.FarmingtonUSA