Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine

2013 Edition
| Editors: Marc D. Gellman, J. Rick Turner

Occupational Science

  • Clare Hocking
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9_903

Definition

Occupational science is the systematic study of the things that people do (their occupations). Occupations include everyday activities undertaken to care for self and others, animals and living and inanimate objects; secure shelter and sustenance; raise children; develop and test abilities, learn, and experience a sense of competence; contribute to family and community; create or distribute material wealth; play and enjoy life; pursue interests; celebrate significant life events; express creativity and spirituality; preserve or regain health; and the things people do for rest and restoration. In brief, occupation is everything people do to occupy themselves ( Townsend, 1997 ). Research is undertaken at the level of individuals, groups, or populations, with an emphasis on understanding what occupations mean to people, occupational patterns, the factors that influence people’s participation in occupation, and the relationship between occupation and health.

Description

Occupatio...

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Health and Environmental SciencesAuckland University of TechnologyAucklandNew Zealand