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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

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MRI

Definition

Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive imaging method used for visualizing structures in the body. The participant is placed in a strong static magnetic field that aligns all atomic nuclei in the body. A radiofrequency pulse is applied at a resonant frequency to selectively energize one type of atom (typically hydrogen). When the pulse is discontinued, the energy is emitted and detected by a detector coil. Due to the differences in concentrations of atoms in different structures, this energy can be used to reconstruct an image of the tissue in the detector coil.

Description

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses several separate components to collect an image. First, a superconducting electromagnet (created by passing electrical current through super-cooled wires) provides a static electromagnetic field. The strength of the magnet is denoted by “Tesla” strength. Most research scanners have a strength of 3.0 T – approximately 600 times more powerful than a...

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References and Readings

  • Duyn, J. H. (2010). Study of brain anatomy with high-field MRI: Recent progress. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 28, 1210–1215.

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  • Huettel, S. A., Song, A. W., & McCarthy, G. (2004). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (2nd ed.). Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates.

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  • Rogers, B. P., Morgan, V. L., Newton, A. T., & Gore, J. C. (2007). Assessing functional connectivity in the human brain by fMRI. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 25, 1347–1357.

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Correspondence to John Ryan .

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© 2013 Springer Science+Business Media, New York

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Ryan, J., Aizenstein, H. (2013). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In: Gellman, M.D., Turner, J.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9_813

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9_813

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4419-1004-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4419-1005-9

  • eBook Packages: MedicineReference Module Medicine