Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine

2013 Edition
| Editors: Marc D. Gellman, J. Rick Turner

Orth-Gomér, Kristina

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9_333

Biographical Information

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Born in Stockholm, Kristina Orth-Gomér was educated with a focus on classic and modern languages at Whitlockska Samskolan, where she obtained baccalaureate in Latin, French, English, and German. After a short period of literature and civilization studies at the University of Lille, France, she began her studies of medicine at the Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. There, she obtained an M.D. in 1972 and a Ph.D. in 1979. She specialized in Internal Medicine in 1980 and later also in Social Medicine/Public Health Sciences.

With an interest in alternative therapies, she spent a semester at the Psychosomatische Kinderklinik, Eppendorf in Hamburg, where she also became involved in the 1968 students movements, which were particularly intense in France and Germany. She married in 1969 and welcomed her first child Johanna in 1973.

Trying to combine motherhood with medicine, Orth-Gomér was appointed an intern in internal medicine at the...

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References and Readings

  1. De Backer, G., Ambrosioni, E., Borch-Johnsen, K., Brotons, C., Cifkova, R., Dallongeville, J., et al. (2003a). European guidelines for CVD prevention in clinical practice. Third joint task force of European and other societies. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, 1, S1–S 78.Google Scholar
  2. De Backer, G., Ambrosioni, E., Borch-Johnsen, K., Brotons, C., Cifkova, R., Dallongeville, J., et al. (2003b). European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. Third joint task force of European and other societies on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. European Heart Journal, 24, 1601–1610.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  4. Leineweber, C., Kecklund, G., Janszky, I., Akerstedt, T., & Orth-Gomer, K. (2003). Poor sleep increases the prospective risk for recurrent events in middle aged women with coronary disease. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 54, 121–127.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Orth Gomer, K., Schnekiderman, N., Wang, H., Walldin, C., Blom, M., & Jernberg, T. (2009). Stress reduction prolongs life in women with coronary disease. The Stockholm Women’s intervention trial for coronary heart disease (SWITCHD). Circulation, 2, 25–32 Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Orth-Gomér, K., Chesney, M., & Wenger, N. K. (1998). Women, stress, and heart disease (pp. 1–298). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  7. Orth-Gomér, K., Horsten, M., Wamala, S. P., et al. (1998). Social relations and extent and severity of coronary artery disease. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study. European Heart Journal, 19(11), 1648–1656.Google Scholar
  8. Orth-Gomer, K., & Johnson, J. V. (1987). Social network interaction and mortality. A six year follow up of a random sample of the Swedish population. Journal of Chronic Diseases, 40(10), 949–957.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Orth-Gomér, K., Mittleman, M. A., Schenck-Gustafsson, K., Wamala, S. P., Eriksson, M., Belkic, K., et al. (1997). Lipoprotein (a) as a determinant of coronary heart disease in young women. Circulation, 2, 329–335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Orth-Gomer, K., Wamala, S., Horsten, M., Schenck-Gustafsson, K., Schneiderman, N., & Mittlemasn, M. (2000). Marital stress worsens prognosis in women with coronary heart disease. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk study. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284(23), 3008–3014.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Wamala, S. P., Mittleman, M. A., Schenck-Gustafsson, K., & Orth-Gomer, K. (1999). Potential explanations for the educational gradient in coronary heart disease: A population based case-control study of Swedish women. American Journal of Public Health, 89, 67–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Wang, H. X., Leineweber, C., Kirkeeide, R., Svane, B., Schenck-gustafsson, K., Theorell, T., & Orth-Gomér, K. J. (2007). Psychosocial stress and atherosclerosis. Family and work stress accelerate progression of coronary disease in women. The Stockholm Female Coronary Angiography study. Journal of Internal Medicine, 261(3), 245–254.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden