Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers

Air Quality Guidelines and Standards

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0851-3_553

Definition of the Subject

Air quality is the state of the atmosphere in which humankind lives and works. The air consists of a complex mixture of gases and suspended droplets and particles. Some of the gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide , within rather tight concentration limits, are essential for sustaining the life of all living things. Some of the gases and aerosol particles and droplets, when certain concentrations are exceeded and with sufficient duration of exposure, may have adverse effects on humans and other living things, including vegetation. Various governmental agencies around the world have developed air quality guidelines and standards for ambient or outdoor air quality. These guidelines or standards, when achieved or attained, are intended to be protective of human health and minimize the potential for other effects such as impacts on visibility or plants. Some government entities and statutes characterize the guidelines as goals to be attained, while other...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Toxicology and Health Risk AnalysisAlbuquerqueUSA