Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

UNESCO World Heritage List and “Imbalanced” Properties: An African Perspective

  • Kaingu Kalume Tinga
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_1961

Introduction

Many countries throughout the world possess rich diverse heritage resources; these are either cultural – humanity’s construction and acquisition over millennia – or natural heritage. In many cases, the cultural heritage and natural heritage are intertwined, thus adding value to the heritage properties (Posey 1999). On realizing that both “the cultural heritage and the natural heritage are increasingly threatened with destruction not only by the traditional causes of decay, but also by changing social and economic conditions which aggravate the situation with even more formidable phenomena of damage or destruction,” the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization meeting in Paris from 17 October to 21 November 1972, at its seventeenth session, decided and adopted that UNESCO and the international community would collaborate with every state party to safeguard the heritage from destruction (UNESCO World Heritage Convention 1972...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Museums of KenyaMalindiKenya