Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Landscape Mapping at West Heslerton

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_1528

Introduction

Archaeological research at West Heslerton, Yorkshire, England, began in 1978, following the chance discovery of Early Anglo-Saxon burials during sand quarrying (Powlesland et al. 1986). Subsequent excavations in advance of quarrying and plowing covered some 35 ha of the Vale of Pickering, exposing prehistoric, Roman and Anglo-Saxon settlements and cemeteries (Figs. 1 and 2). Revealing a portion of ancient landscape at such a large scale emphasized that the narrative of human occupation was expressed by a continuum of activity rather than by a number of dispersed sites of different ages. It also raised the question of the wider context of the excavated area and the nature of the landscape of which it formed a part. The Landscape Research Centre (LRC) was created to map the total archaeology of the Vale of Pickering, testing and developing methods of remote mapping and analysis. Now in action for more than the 30 years, the LRC has recorded over 1,000 ha of contiguous...
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References

  1. Powlesland, D. 2012. The Landscape Research Centre Digital Atlas of Archaeological Research in the Vale of Pickering. An online resource employing Google Earth to publish primary data and time linked interpretive overlays covering the LRC core remote sensing dataset. Available at: http://www.landscaperesearchcentre.org/atlas/LRC_Atlas.html.
  2. Powlesland, D.J. C. A. Haughton & J. H. Hanson. 1986. Excavations at Heslerton, North Yorkshire 1978-82. Archaeological Journal 143: 53-173.Google Scholar
  3. Powlesland, D., J. Lyall & D. Donoghue. 1997. Enhancing the record through remote sensing: the application and integration of multi-sensor, non-invasive remote sensing techniques for the enhancement of the Sites and Monuments Record, Heslerton Parish Project, N. Yorkshire, England. Internet Archaeology 2. Available at: http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue2/pld/index.html.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Landscape Research Centre & The McDonald Institute, University of CambridgeCambridgeUK