Encyclopedia of the History of Psychological Theories

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert W. Rieber

Salzinger, Kurt

  • Richard S. Feldman
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0463-8_306

Kurt Salzinger has been a forceful advocate for behaviorism as the basis for a science of psychology throughout his professional career. Not long after receiving his doctorate from Columbia University in 1954, where he had a teaching assistantship with Otto Klineberg, he was hired by Joseph Zubin, the chief of the recently established Biometrics Unit at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, remaining there as a research scientist until 1991. The principal theme of his work then and to the present day quickly became evident: the heuristic value of the behaviorist approach and the utility of behavior analysis for furthering an understanding of the full range of human behavior, both normal and pathological. When countering competing theoretical perspectives, he has used the opportunity to offer alternative, behavioral formulations; in taking issue with aspects of the cognitive perspective, for example, he presented a behavioral analysis of cognition itself (Salzinger 1987).

Salzinger...

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References

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard S. Feldman
    • 1
  1. 1.New YorkUSA