Encyclopedia of the History of Psychological Theories

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert W. Rieber

Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Psychology, The Legacy of William James

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0463-8_188

WilliamJames, M.D. (1842–1910), Harvard Medical School Class of 1869, Father of American Psychology, internationally known philosopher of pragmatism, and a key figure in bringing Harvard into the twentieth century as an international university, was born in the Astor Hotel in New York City, January 11, 1842. He was the eldest of five children by Henry James Sr. and Mary Robertson Walsh. Henry James Sr.’s father was William James of Albany, a businessman who successively had three wives, two of which he outlived, and 13 children. William of Albany, a staunch Calvinist in the Presbyterian Church, had made one of the largest fortunes in the American colonies, investing in, among other projects, the Erie Canal. This caused his grandson Henry the novelist, William’s younger brother, to claim that “the family was not guilty of doing a lick of business for two-and-a-half generations.” Henry James Sr., a Christian socialist, had attended theology school for two-and-a-half-years before...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Saybrook UniversitySan FranciscoUSA