Encyclopedia of Geobiology

2011 Edition
| Editors: Joachim Reitner, Volker Thiel

Waulsortian Mud Mounds

  • Marta Rodríguez-Martínez
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9212-1_213

Synonyms

Waulsortian banks; Waulsortian buildups; Waulsortian mounds; Waulsortian mudbanks; Waulsortian reefs

Definition

Waulsortian mud mounds are characterized by different types of complex and highly structured fabrics of carbonate muds, texturally and genetically varied (both automicrites and allomicrites occur), with a variable content in skeletal components (heterozoan assemblages). Their origin is controversial although most authors advocate a microbial origin (calcite precipitation microbially induced). They were developed throughout the northern hemisphere in many parts of the World (Europe and North America) during the Carboniferous times (Lower Mississippian, mainly in the Tournaisian). These mud mounds grew on wider ramps and within basins in tropical “calcite seas,” immersed in a period of intense global changes (tectonic activity related with the Variscan orogeny and major sea-level changes).

Introduction

The term, from the Waulsort area, was first introduced  by Dupont (

Keywords

Extracellular Polymeric Substance Sponge Spicule Siliceous Sponge Mound Facies Bioclastic Wackestones 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de Geología Facultad de BiologíaUniversidad de AlcaláAlcalá de HenaresSpain