Encyclopedia of Global Justice

2011 Edition
| Editors: Deen K. Chatterjee

Unilateral Rights

  • Eric Smaw
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_404

Most international rights and obligations arise out of bilateral or multilateral treaties concluded by states, multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, and other entities with standing in the international community. Indeed, when states, multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, and other entities with standing in the international community enter into treaties, they procure reciprocal rights and obligations vis-a-vis one another. For example, under Chapter1, Article 2, paragraph 4 of the Charter of the United Nations, all of the members of the United Nations incur, among other things, obligations to refrain from violating the territorial integrity of each of the members of the United Nations, and, conversely, each of the members of the United Nations acquires, among other things, rights to take any member of the United Nations who violates its territorial integrity to the Security Council to have their dispute resolved.

Occasionally, however, an...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

References

  1. Carter B(2009–2010) Charter of the United Nations, in international law: selected documents. Wolters Kluwer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Forsythe D, Weiss TG, Coate RA, Pease KK (2004)United Nations and changing world politics. Westview, BoulderGoogle Scholar
  3. Shrooshi D. The United Nations and the development of collective security: the delegation by the security council of its chapter VII powers. Oxford Publishing, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Smaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and ReligionRollins CollegeWinter ParkUSA