Encyclopedia of Global Justice

2011 Edition
| Editors: Deen K. Chatterjee

Liberalism

  • Paul Warren
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_316

Liberalism begins to take shape in the wake of the Protestant Reformation and religious wars of the early modern period. It emerges as a distinctive political orientation with the growth of the territorial state and rapid economic, social, scientific, and cultural transformations of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It continues to be a dominant school of thought in political philosophy and a potent political force in the world.

Liberalism can take different forms and be approached from various perspectives. There is debate about what constitutes its definitional core and some have argued that it is best understood as a cluster of connected and evolving positions, value commitments, and arguments. Keeping these points in mind, a distinction can be made between liberalism’s constitutive positions and the more abstract philosophical theories used to justify those positions. Liberal positions are derivable from a variety of philosophical stances: natural rights, social contract,...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Beitz C (2000) Rawls’ law of peoples. Ethics 110:669–696CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berlin I (2002) Two concepts of liberty. In: Hardy H (ed) Liberty. Oxford University Press, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dewey J (1935) Liberalism and social action. Capricorn Books, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Dworkin R (1978) Liberalism. In: Hampshire S (ed) Public and private morality. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  5. Hobhouse LT (1964) Liberalism. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  6. Kant I (1970) Perpetual peace: a philosophical sketch. In: Hans R (ed) Political writings. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  7. Kymlicka W (2002) Contemporary political philosophy, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  8. Locke J (1960) Two treatises of government, ed. Laslett P. Cambridge, Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  9. Mill JS (1989) On liberty and other writings, ed. Collini S. Cambridge, Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  10. Pogge T (2002) World poverty and human rights. Polity Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  11. Rawls J (1971) A theory of justice. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  12. Rawls J (1993) Political liberalism. Columbia University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  13. Rawls J (1999) The law of peoples. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Warren
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA