Encyclopedia of the World's Coastal Landforms

2010 Edition
| Editors: Eric C. F. Bird

Bahrein

  • Eric Bird
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8639-7_193

Introduction

The island of Bahrein has a coastline 126 km long, and is accompanied by more than 30 small islands. Bahrein is linked to Saudi Arabia by a causeway. The island is low-lying and rocky, a dome structure with a central core of Eocene limestones, sandstones, and marls, the land rising to Jabal Dukhan, an interior hill with a summit 135 m above sea level (Willis 1967), surrounded by in-facing escarpments. There is a broad coastal fringe of unconsolidated Quaternary silts, quartzose dune sands, carbonate sands in beaches and beach ridges, shell deposits, and evaporites. The southern half of the island is a barren sandy plain with some salt marshes, and the northern half is a broad plateau with settlements and gardens irrigated from artesian wells. Groundwater seeping from Saudi Arabia is under sufficient pressure to generate submarine freshwater springs off the north coast.

The climate is hot and humid. Bahrein has 19° in January and 36° in July, and the mean annual rainfall is...

Keywords

Dust Lithification Sandstone Beach Silt 
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References

  1. Doornkamp JC, Brunsden D, Jones DKC (1980) Geology, geomorphology and pedology of Bahrain. Geo Abstracts Limited, NorwichGoogle Scholar
  2. Shinn EA (1969) Submarine lithification of Holocene carbonate sediment in the Persian Gulf. Sedimentology 12:109–144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Willis RP (1967) Geology of the Arabian Peninsula: Bahrain. U.S. Geol Sur Prof Pap 560-E. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Bird
    • 1
  1. 1.GeostudiesMelbourneAustralia