Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions

2013 Edition
| Editors: Anne L. C. Runehov, Lluis Oviedo

Mindfulness (Buddhist)

  • Bhikkhu Anālayo
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8265-8_1594

Related Terms

Description

Mindfulness is a quality of central importance in Buddhist meditation theory. The most basic nuance conveyed by the term sati or smṛti in its Buddhist use is a detached awareness of a situation, comprehensively capturing its internal and external aspects, in order to fully understand what is really taking place. This invests the cultivation of mindfulness in the Buddhist traditions with a concern that bears considerable similarity to scientific investigation.

Mindfulness in its early Buddhist usage stands for an ability to fully apprehend, which at the same time bears a close relation to the ability to remember later what happened. Canonical definitions of mindfulness tend to highlight this recollective aspect, explaining that one who has mindfulness will be able to remember what has been said or done long ago (Trenckner and Chalmers 1888–1896, I, 356).

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References

Primary Sources

  1. Alsdorf, L., & Norman, K. R. (Eds.). (1966). Thera- and Therīgāthā. London/Oxford: Pali Text Society.Google Scholar
  2. Andersen, D., & Smith, H. (Eds.). (1913). The Sutta-nipāta. London/Oxford: Pali Text Society.Google Scholar
  3. Feer, L. (Ed.). (1884–1898). The Samyutta Nikāya (5 Vols.). London/Oxford: Pali Text Society.Google Scholar
  4. Morris, R., & Hardy, E. (Eds.). (1885–1900). The Aṅguttara Nikāya (5 Vols.). London/Oxford: Pali Text Society.Google Scholar
  5. Trenckner, V., & Chalmers, R. (Eds.). (1888–1896). The Majjhima Nikāya (3 Vols.). London/Oxford: Pali Text Society.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

  1. Anālayo, Bh. (2003). Satipaṭṭhāna, the direct path to realization. Birmingham: Windhorse.Google Scholar
  2. Kuan, T. (2008). Mindfulness in early Buddhism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Ñāṇaponika, Th. (1986). The power of mindfulness. Kandy: BPS.Google Scholar
  4. Sīlananda, U. (1990). The four foundations of mindfulness. Boston: Wisdom.Google Scholar
  5. Soma, T. (1981). The way of mindfulness. Kandy: BPS.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bhikkhu Anālayo
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Buddhist StudiesUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany