Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

2007 Edition
| Editors: David Gubbins, Emilio Herrero-Bervera

Magnetic Anomalies For Geology and Resources

  • Colin Reeves
  • Juha V. Korhonen
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-4423-6_171

Magnetic anomalies and geological mapping

Knowledge of the geology of a region is the scientific basis for resource exploration ( petroleum, solid minerals, groundwater) the world over. Among the variety of rock types to be found in the Earth's crust, many exhibit magnetic properties, whether a magnetization induced by the present‐day geomagnetic field, or a remanent magnetization acquired at some time in the geological past, or a combination of both. Mapping the patterns of magnetic anomalies attributable to rock magnetism has proved to be a very effective way of reconnoitering large areas of geology at low cost per unit area. The fact that most sedimentary rocks and surface‐cover formations (including water) are effectively nonmagnetic means that the observed anomalies are attributable to the underlying igneous and metamorphic rocks (the so‐called “magnetic basement”), even where they are concealed from direct observation at the surface. Anomalies arising from the magnetic basement...
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Reeves
  • Juha V. Korhonen

There are no affiliations available