Encyclopedia of Paleoclimatology and Ancient Environments

2009 Edition
| Editors: Vivien Gornitz

Ocean Drilling Program (Odp)

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-4411-3_156
  • 215 Downloads

History

For more than 30 years, the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) has sent hundreds of scientists out from their universities and laboratories to the far corners of the world’s oceans in search of sediments and rocks that tell the story of Earth’s restless past. The ancient ocean depths, long thought to be a barren and unchanging primordial environment, have yielded their secrets of how our planet’s powerful yet delicate ecosystem functions.

The Ocean Drilling Program constitutes one part of a systematic geologic investigation of the Earth that has been ongoing since the eighteenth century. It is only in the past thirty years that scientific ocean drilling conducted by ODP and its predecessor, the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) has taken center stage as one of the main contributors to our understanding of the system that drives Earth’s evolution. ODP focuses its inquiry into the physics, chemistry, and biology of the Earth’s processes using two basic data collection strategies: (a)...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Bibliography

  1. Davis, E., and Becker, K., 1998. Borehole observations record driving forces for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust. Eos, Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, 79(31), 377–378.Google Scholar
  2. Dick, H.J.B., et al., 2000. A long in-situ section of the lower ocean crust: results of ODP Leg 176 drilling at the Southwest Indian Ridge. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 179, 31–51.Google Scholar
  3. Fisk, M.R., 1997. Evidence for Microbes inOceanic Balasts: Glass-Eating Bacteria? ODP’s Greatest Hits; Contributions from the U.S. Scientific Community. Washington, DC: Joint Oceanographic Institutions, 15.Google Scholar
  4. Goldberg, D., 1997. The role of downhole measurements in marine geology and geophysics. Rev. Geophys., 35–3, 315–342.Google Scholar
  5. Haug, G.H., Tiedemann, R., Zahn, R., and Ravelo, A.C., 2001. Role of Panama uplift on oceanic freshwater balance. Geology, 29, 207–210.Google Scholar
  6. Hay, W.W., 1988. Paleoceanography: A Review for the GSA Centennial. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 100, 1,934–1,956.Google Scholar
  7. Kennett, J., 1982. Marine Geology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 811pp.Google Scholar
  8. Lear, C.H., Elderfield, H., and Wilson, P.A., 2000. Cenozoic deep-sea temperatures and global ice volumes from Mg/Ca in benthic foraminiferal calcite. Science, 287, 269–272.Google Scholar
  9. Norris, R.D., 1997. Records of the Apocalypse: ODP Drills the K/T Boundary, ODP’s Greatest Hits; Contributions from the U.S. Scientific Community. Washington, DC: Joint Oceanographic Institutions, 9.Google Scholar
  10. Parkes, R.J., Cragg, B.A., Bale, S.J., Getcliff, K., Goodman, P.A., Rochelle, J.J.F., Weightman, A.J., and Harvey, S.M., 1994. Deep bacterial biosphere in Pacific Ocean sediments. Nature, 371, 410–413.Google Scholar
  11. Smith, D.C., 2002. Microbes: Life Deep Beneath the Seafloor, ODP Highlights; International Scientific Contributions from the Ocean Drilling Program. Washington, DC: Joint Oceanographic Institutions, 6.Google Scholar
  12. Suyehiro, K., 2002. The Earth’s Next Move, ODP Highlights; International Scientific Contributions from the Ocean Drilling Program. Washington, DC: Joint Oceanographic Institutions, 25.Google Scholar
  13. Whitmarsh, R.B., Manatschal, G., and Minshull, T.A., 2001. Evolution of magma-poor continental margins from final rifting to seafloor spreading. Nature, 413, 150–154.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available