Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards

2013 Edition
| Editors: Peter T. Bobrowsky

Landslide Types

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-4399-4_344

Synonyms

Landslide classification; Landslide description; Landslide names

Definition

Landslides, movements of masses of rock, earth, or debris down slopes, have observable characteristics (activity, rate of movement, moisture content, material, type of movement). Landslides with similar characteristics belong to the same landslide type.

Introduction

What can you usefully observe about a landslide? How can these observations be succinctly and unambiguously described? These are questions which have found answers in classifications of landslides. The International Union of Geological Sciences Working Group on Landslides has developed an international consensus on landslide classification which has been summarized in the Multilingual Landslide Glossary (WP/WLI, 1993b). This classification, the Working Classification, has been used in the latest edition of the Transportation Research Board’s Special Report (Turner and Schuster, 1996) to update Varnes’ (1978) widely used classification....

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada