Encyclopedia of Soil Science

2008 Edition
| Editors: Ward Chesworth

Chemical Analyses

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3995-9_96

Introduction

Chemical analyses of soils are important in assessing the nutrient status of soils for agricultural production, and in determining the environmental hazards imposed on soils by industrial, municipal, and agricultural wastes. Traditionally, the emphasis of soil chemical analyses has been on evaluating soils in regard to their agricultural productivity. Specifically, to measure plant nutrient levels and other chemical factors (pH, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, etc.) which determine a soil's suitability as a plant growth medium. More recently, the scope of soil chemical analyses has expanded to evaluation of a soil in regard to environmental quality. Worldwide, concerns have been expressed about numerous soil and water contaminants. These include nitrates and phosphates, metalloids and metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, and nickel; radionuclides, pesticides, and contaminants from municipal and animal wastes.

Soil chemical...

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks

There are no affiliations available