Encyclopedia of Soil Science

2008 Edition
| Editors: Ward Chesworth

Carbon Sequestration in Soil

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3995-9_89

Carbon sequestration is the result of a series of processes through which carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is removed from biogeochemical circulation and accumulated in soil and biomass. The present article emphasizes the soil‐dependent factors that have bearing on the effectiveness of C sequestration regardless of the general climatic constraints.

In a first stage, atmospheric carbon is incorporated by photosynthetic plants, which synthesize complex biomacromolecules. When organic remains in addition to microbial bodies decay in soil, a portion of the C stabilizes into the soil (soil C sequestration or humification), the remainder being released mainly as CO 2 and H 2O (mineralization). In environmental situations where the above balance shifts to humification, a progressive increase in soil C concentration will be produced through time. This contributes to alleviating the greenhouse effect, global warming and hence climatic change (Batjes, 1998).

Rough estimations point to the fact...

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros

There are no affiliations available