Encyclopedia of Soil Science

2008 Edition
| Editors: Ward Chesworth

Aggregate Stability to Drying and Wetting

  • Randy A. Dahlgren
  • Felipe Macías
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Wayne P. Robarge
  • Felipe Macías
  • Bryon W. Bache
  • W. W. Emerson
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3995-9_16

Aggregate stability may be defined as the extent to which portions of soil remain intact when stressed by environmental factors. Here, the emphasis is on wetting and drying. For dry soil, the maximum possible stress is imposed by immersing portions in water. In the case of wet aggregates, possible weakening due to recent cultivation has to be taken into account. This effect is maximized by remoulding a soil at field capacity and then immersing wet portions in water. In the case of surface soil aggregates, mechanical stress and stress due to wetting are applied simultaneously by raindrops. Only an indirect simulation of the effect of rain is discussed here using end‐ over‐end shaking. An indication of the likely effect of severe rain is also obtaining by finding out how wet a soil can be remoulding before the stability of a wet portion is reduced.

Breakup of aggregates on wetting

Slaking. The initial breakup of aggregates when immersed in water (Figure A12a, b) is caused by...
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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randy A. Dahlgren
  • Felipe Macías
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Wayne P. Robarge
  • Felipe Macías
  • Bryon W. Bache
  • W. W. Emerson

There are no affiliations available