Encyclopedia of Soil Science

2008 Edition
| Editors: Ward Chesworth

Conservation

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Rhodes W. Fairbridge
  • Arieh Singer
  • Hari Eswaran
  • Erika Micheli
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • P. M. Huang
  • Arieh Singer
  • Charles E. Weaver
  • B. K. G. Theng
  • Iain M. Young
  • Keith Paustian
  • R. J. Heck
  • Charles W. Finkl
  • Herman Bouwer
  • Amos Hadas
  • Ward Chesworth
  • David Lavigne
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3995-9_127
There are essentially two traditions in conservation: the arcadian (or romantic) tradition of the Reverend Gilbert White that eventually gave rise in the United States to the Protectionist School of Conservation, most often identified with John Muir (Figure C62, above the time line); and the utilitarian tradition of Frances Bacon (Worster, 1994; and Figure C62, below the time line). Bacon's anthropocentric and imperialistic view of nature (which can be traced back to Genesis 1:26) is a lineal ancestor of the “Agricultural revolution” of the 18th century, which eventually gave rise to the utilitarian school of conservation represented in our own time by the U.S. Bureau of Land Reclamation and of Soil Conservation in particular (Figure C62).
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Bibliography

  1. Bennett, H.H., 1939. Soil Conservation. New York. London: McGraw‐Hill, 993 pp.Google Scholar
  2. Brink, W., 1951. Big Hugh: the father of soil conservation. New York: Macmillan, 167 pp.Google Scholar
  3. Diamond, J.M., 2005. Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed. New York: Viking, 575 pp.Google Scholar
  4. Helms, D., 1992. Readings in the History of the Soil Conservation Service. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, Economics and Social Sciences Division, 174 pp.Google Scholar
  5. Lavigne, D.M. (ed.), 2006. Gaining Ground: In pursuit of ecological sustainability. Guelph and Limerick: International Fund for Animal Welfare and University of Limerick. 425 pp.Google Scholar
  6. Leopold, A., 1949. A Sand County Almanac, and Sketches Here and There; illus. by Schwartz, C.W. New York: Oxford University Press, 226 pp.Google Scholar
  7. Martin, A., 1975. The Last Generation: The End of Survival. Glasgow: Fontana, 188 pp.Google Scholar
  8. NRCS, 2003. Annual National Resources Inventory: Soil Erosion. Washington, DC: National Resource Conservation Service. 10 pp.Google Scholar
  9. WCED (World Commission on Environment and Development), 1987. Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 383 pp.Google Scholar
  10. Worster, D., 1994. Nature's Economy: A History of Ecological Ideas. UK: Cambridge University Press, 505 pp.Google Scholar
  11. Wright, R., 2004. A Short History of Progress. Toronto: House of Anansi Press, 211 pp.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Rhodes W. Fairbridge
  • Arieh Singer
  • Hari Eswaran
  • Erika Micheli
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • P. M. Huang
  • Arieh Singer
  • Charles E. Weaver
  • B. K. G. Theng
  • Iain M. Young
  • Keith Paustian
  • R. J. Heck
  • Charles W. Finkl
  • Herman Bouwer
  • Amos Hadas
  • Ward Chesworth
  • David Lavigne

There are no affiliations available