Encyclopedia of Soil Science

2008 Edition
| Editors: Ward Chesworth

Classification of Soils: Soil Taxonomy

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Rhodes W. Fairbridge
  • Arieh Singer
  • Hari Eswaran
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3995-9_103

Introduction

Most countries of the world have some kind of soil survey program. Some programs assess soil resources at the farm level, while others are designed for county, state, or national levels. The United States began soil resource assessment around 1899, but it began an institutionalized, systematic detailed soil survey only in the nineteen thirties. By the end of the nineteen forties, about fifty million acres of land per year were being surveyed and more than one thousand soil scientists from the Soil Conservation Service (now called the Natural Resources Conservation Service – NRCS) and U.S. universities were involved. The then existing classification system did not serve the purpose of standardization, quality control, and communication between soil scientists. It was recognized that the national soil survey program needed a system of soil classification that could be applied uniformly by soil scientists, could be the basis of the soil survey program, serve the purpose of...

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ward Chesworth
  • Marta Camps Arbestain
  • Felipe Macías
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Y. Mualem
  • H. J. Morel‐Seytoux
  • William R. Horwath
  • G. Almendros
  • Ward Chesworth
  • Paul R. Grossl
  • Donald L. Sparks
  • Otto Spaargaren
  • Rhodes W. Fairbridge
  • Arieh Singer
  • Hari Eswaran

There are no affiliations available