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Water-, Sanitation-, and Hygiene-Related Diseases

  • Reference work entry
  • First Online:
Infectious Diseases
  • Originally published in
  • R. A. Meyers (ed.), Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2021

Glossary and Acronyms

APOC:

African Program for Onchocerciasis Control

DALY:

Disability-adjusted life year – The sum of years of potential life lost due to premature mortality and the years of productive life lost due to disability.

MDA:

Mass drug administration

NTDs: Neglected tropical diseases:

A medically diverse set of diseases and disease groups that disproportionately affect populations living in poverty, predominantly in tropical and subtropical areas. They are termed neglected because they lack the visibility, research support, and funding of other, more high profile, infections, and health conditions. While some diseases can result in severe disease and death, others can lead to chronic suffering as well as disability and can lead to stigmatization and social exclusion of affected individuals. They impose a significant human, social, and economic burden. WHO has listed 20 diseases and disease groups as NTDs.

OCP:

Onchocerciasis Control Program

STH:

Soil transmitted helminths:...

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Velleman, Y., Blair, L., Fleming, F., Fenwick, A. (2023). Water-, Sanitation-, and Hygiene-Related Diseases. In: Shulman, L.M. (eds) Infectious Diseases. Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology Series. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-2463-0_547

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