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Synonyms

CFL Test; COWA; COWAT; Letter fluency; Phonemic fluency; Verbal fluency

Description

The F-A-S Test, a subtest of the Neurosensory Center Comprehensive Examination for Aphasia (NCCEA; Spreen & Benton, 1977), is a measure of phonemic word fluency, which is a type of verbal fluency. It assesses phonemic fluency by requesting an individual to orally produce as many words as possible that begin with the letters F, A, and S within a prescribed time frame, usually 1 min (see Borkowski, Benton, & Spreen, 1967, Spreen & Benton, 1977; Spreen & Risser, 2003, and Strauss, Sherman, & Spreen, 2006, for specific administration instructions).

Verbal fluency is a cognitive function that facilitates information retrieval from memory. Successful retrieval requires executive control over cognitive process such as selective attention, mental set shifting, internal response generation, and self-monitoring. Tests of verbal fluency evaluate an individual’s ability to retrieve specific information...

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References and Readings

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Patterson, J. (2011). F-A-S Test. In: Kreutzer, J.S., DeLuca, J., Caplan, B. (eds) Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79948-3_886

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79948-3_886

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-387-79947-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-387-79948-3

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