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Confrontation Naming

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Synonyms

Word finding

Definition

Confrontation naming involves the selection of a specific label corresponding to a viewed stimulus, usually a picture, of a viewed object or action. Confrontation naming also refers to a type of task used in assessment when problems with naming are of concern.

Current Knowledge

Confrontation naming tasks often are incorporated as part of clinical language testing to detect impairments of word-finding abilities in individuals with various types of neurologic impairments typically affecting the left hemisphere of the brain (Spreen & Risser, 2003). Although word finding takes place during the course of sentence generation in conversational speech, it is most often tested clinically in confrontation naming tasks where the vocabulary tested is constrained to known, identified target words. Therefore, word-finding functions are at times referred to as naming abilities (e.g., Chialant, Costa, & Caramazza, 2002).

The most common published test of confrontation...

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References and Readings

  • Chialant, D., Costa, A., & Caramazza, A. (2002). Models of naming. In A. E. Hillis (Ed.), The handbook of adult language disorders (pp. 123–142). New York: Psychology Press.

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  • Druks, J., & Masterson, J. (2000). An object and action naming battery. Hove, UK: Psychology Press.

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  • German, D. J. (1990). Test of adolescent/adult word finding. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

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  • Goodglass, H., Kaplan, E., & Barresi, B. (2001). The assessment of aphasia and related disorders (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

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  • Kaplan, E., Goodglass, H., & Weintraub, S. (2001). The Boston naming test. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

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  • Laine, M., & Martin, N. (2006). Anomia: Theoretical and clinical aspects. New York: Psychology Press.

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  • Spreen, O., & Risser, A. H. (2003). Assessment of aphasia. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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  • Tranel, D., Adolphs, R., Damasio, H., & Damasio, A. R. (2001). A neural basis for the retrieval of words for actions. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 18(7), 655–670.

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Raymer, A. (2011). Confrontation Naming. In: Kreutzer, J.S., DeLuca, J., Caplan, B. (eds) Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79948-3_875

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