Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2011 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Alzheimer’s Dementia

  • JoAnn T. Tschanz
  • Aaron Andersen
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79948-3_489

Synonyms

Short Description or Definition

One of the leading causes of dementia in late-life, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a gradual onset and progressive course, affecting memory and other cognitive domains. For a diagnosis, the cognitive impairments of AD must not occur exclusively in the context of a delirium, and must be of sufficient severity to cause impairment in social or occupational functioning. Diagnoses of AD (Possible or Probable AD) are based on the history and presentation of clinical symptoms, evidence of cognitive impairment, and the exclusion of other causes of dementia such as stroke, metabolic disorders, or other conditions that may account for the cognitive impairment. A diagnosis of Definite AD is based upon postmortem neuropathological analysis and is made when there are sufficient...

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References and Readings

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  7. Orgogozo, J.-M. (2003). Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease with cholinesterase inhibitors. An update on currently used drugs. In K. Iqbal & B. Winblad (Eds.), Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders: Research advances (pp. 663–675). Bucharest, Romania: Ana Asian International Academy of Aging.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • JoAnn T. Tschanz
    • 1
  • Aaron Andersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah State UniversityCenter for Epidemiologic StudiesLoganUSA