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Relational Frame Theory

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Synonyms

RFT

Definition

Relational Frame Theory (RFT; [13]) is a behavior analytic theory that analyzes and explains the development of language and cognition in terms of learned, generalized, contextually-controlled patterns of relational responding, referred to as arbitrarily applicable relational responding or relational framing.

Description

Relational Frame Theory (RFT; [13]) is a behavior analytic approach to language and cognition. Behavior analysis has traditionally been regarded as an extremely effective approach with regard to training non-verbal skills in non-humans and non-verbally able humans but has been seen as deficient in terms of its ability to account for the generative nature of human language (see [6]). Relational Frame Theorists would agree that traditional behavioral accounts such as that of Skinner [22] are theoretically inadequate with respect to this aspect of language. However, they argue that the novel generalized relational operant account provided by RFT...

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References

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Correspondence to Ian Stewart .

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Stewart, I. (2011). Relational Frame Theory. In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_3143

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