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Sleeper Effect of Divorce

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Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development

Synonyms

Adult children of divorce; Intergenerational transmission of divorce; Long-term effects of divorce; Sleeper influence

Definition

The sleeper effect of divorce refers to the phenomenon whereby individuals who previously showed positive recovery following childhood parental divorce later exhibit adjustment difficulties in young adulthood stemming from the earlier experience of parental divorce [1, 2]. Studies show that some children and adolescents who appear to recover and cope well after parental divorce have long-term effects in young adulthood that were not expected based on previous adjustment. Longitudinal research suggests that as children of divorce enter adulthood, they may be more likely than the general population to experience concerns about not being loved, have difficulties in relationship formation and maintenance, and have fears regarding betrayal and abandonment in romantic relationships [2]. Furthermore, in comparison to their young adult counterparts from...

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References

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Correspondence to Pamela A. Sarigiani .

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Sarigiani, P.A., Spierling, T. (2011). Sleeper Effect of Divorce. In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_2666

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_2666

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-387-77579-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-387-79061-9

  • eBook Packages: Behavioral Science

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