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Religion

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Definition

Religion is defined by Webster’s dictionary (Unabridged) as the “belief in a divine or superhuman power or powers to be obeyed and worshiped as the creator(s) and ruler(s) of the universe.”

Description

Throughout human existence, man has had the need to understand and explain to himself and others the origins and meanings of the common natural phenomena and the wonders of the world around him. Early men, in every known culture, used their creative imagination to make up stories about the natural events such as floods, earthquakes, eclipses of the sun and moon, and the like. Often in their attempt to make their stories credulous, they gave them anthropomorphic qualities. The Greeks, for example, as early as 2000 B.C., created highly imaginative, wise and instructive myths about gods, which were passed from generation to generation by word of mouth long before the invention of the printing press. In fact, they were the first people who created gods and goddesses that looked...

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_2404
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References

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  8. Spinks, G. (1967). Psychology and religion. Boston, MA. Beacon Press Books.

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© 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC

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Quintar, B. (2011). Religion. In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_2404

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