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Academic Readiness

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Synonyms

Learning readiness; School readiness

Definition

Academic readiness is an estimate, based on qualitative and/or quantitative information, about whether a preschool child is ready to handle the various demands of the structured educational environment.

Description

There is no universal definition for academic readiness. Many kindergarten teachers, parents, and early childcare providers believe that academic readiness involves being “healthy, well-fed, and well rested; being able to express their needs, wants, and thoughts; and being enthusiastic and curious about new activities” [10, p. 23]. According to Buntaine and Costenbader [4], developmental age, which is the rate through which a child progresses through developmental stages, is the most commonly used method of assessing academic readiness. Still others believe a more effective way of predicting later academic success is through using psychometrically sound empirical tests which measure specific cognitive, pre-academic,...

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References

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Luther, J. (2011). Academic Readiness. In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_22

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