Skip to main content

Abstract Mapping

  • Reference work entry
  • 235 Accesses

Synonyms

Concept formation; Mental mapping

Definition

Abstract mapping refers to the process of linking the essential conceptual elements from two sets of information to form new knowledge.

Description

Abstract mapping is a psycholinguistic model that attempts to explain the processes needed to form concepts as well as to organize and to integrate information to support memory, reasoning, and learning [1, 2]. Abstract mapping is an extension of models used to describe young children’s acquisition of new vocabulary, syntax, and expressive language skills [1, 3, 5, 7].

Mapping refers to the connecting of the underlying elements (abstract) from two sets of information to form a new concept. The connections or correspondences are made between a familiar knowledge base (source) with new stimuli (target). The correspondences are based upon similarities of perceptual features, functions, relationships, and meanings. The process of forming and altering connections contribute to the increase...

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_17
  • Chapter length: 2 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   949.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-387-79061-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   999.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

References

  1. Fauconnier, G. (1997). Mappings in thought and language. Cambridge: Cambridge, UK.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Feld, J. (2004). Psycholinguistics: The key concepts. New York: Rutledge.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Forbus, K. (2001). Exploring analogy in the large. In D. Gentner, K. Holyoak, & B. Kokinov (Eds.), The analogical mind: Perspectives from cognitive science (pp. 24–58). Cambridge, MA: MIT.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Gattis, M. (2001). Space as a basis for abstract thought. In M. Gattis (Ed.), Spatial schemas and abstract thought (pp. 1–12). Cambridge, MA: MIT.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Karmiloff, K., & Karmiloff-Smith, A. (2002). Pathways to language: From fetus to adolescent. Cambridge, MA: Harvard.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Piaget, J., Henriques, G., & Ascher, E. (1992). Morphisms and categories: Comparing and transforming (T. Brown, Ed. & Trans.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Tomasello, M. (2003). Constructing a language: A usage-based theory of language acquisition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC

About this entry

Cite this entry

Millians, M. (2011). Abstract Mapping. In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_17

Download citation