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Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)

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Synonyms

Applied behavioral assessment; Behavior analysis

Definition

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a scientific approach in which procedures based on the principles of behavior are systematically applied to identify environmental variables that influence socially significant behavior and are used to develop individualized and practical interventions [24].

Description

Rooted philosophically and theoretically in the science that informs the practice of Behaviorism, behavior analysis is an umbrella term that encompasses three interrelated branches including applied behavior analysis (ABA), experimental analysis of behavior (EAB), and behaviorism. ABA involves experimental single-subject designs used to demonstrate the functional relationship between environmental variables and socially significant problem behavior. Findings derived from ABA research embody the breadth of literature behavior analysts use to guide their professional practice. EAB also involves single-subject...

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Harker, S. (2011). Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). In: Goldstein, S., Naglieri, J.A. (eds) Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_173

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