Encyclopedia of Language and Education

2008 Edition
| Editors: Nancy H. Hornberger

Language Minority Education in Japan

  • Yasuko Kanno
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30424-3_234

Introduction

Currently there are 20,692 foreign‐national students in Japanese public schools (elementary through high school) identified by the Ministry of Education as “requiring Japanese language instruction” (Monbukagakusho, 2006b) (henceforth referred to as Japanese as a Second Language [JSL] students). This is still a tiny fraction—0.13%—of the total student population. However, the number has nearly quadrupled since the ministry started a tally in 1991 (5,463), and the JSL students are spread across 5,281, or 13% of all public schools in Japan. The fact that 80% of the JSL students attend schools where there are fewer than 5 of them while 1% attend schools with more than 30 such students (Monbukagakusho, 2005b) suggests that there are pockets of regions across the country with large concentrations of foreign‐national families. Brazilians, Chinese, and Peruvians make up more than 70% of the JSL students in public schools (Monbukagakusho, 2006b).

This chapter provides an overview...

Keywords

Junior High School Language Minority Compulsory Education Japanese Language Japanese Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuko Kanno
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishUniversity of WashingtonWA 98195USA