Encyclopedia of Language and Education

2008 Edition
| Editors: Nancy H. Hornberger

Policy, Practice and Power: Language Ecologies of South African Classrooms

  • Margie Probyn
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30424-3_232

Introduction

The linguistic ecologies of South African classrooms are embedded in complex local, national and global linguistic ecologies, with far‐reaching implications for access and equity in education.

South Africa is a multilingual country with 11 official languages now recognised in the democratic Constitution of 1996 (South Africa, Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996) (see Table 1).
Table 1

South African official languages and speakers

Official languages and percentage of population speaking languages as first home language

 

IsisZulu

24

 

IsiXhosa

18

 

Afrikaans

13

 

Sepedi

9

 

English

8

 

Setswana

8

 

Sesotho

8

 

Xitsonga

4

 

Siswati

3

 

Tshivenda

2

 

IsiNdebele

2

 

Source: Census 2001 in South Africa, Statistics South Africa ( 2004).

Keywords

Education Policy Language Policy Rural School Home Language Political Struggle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margie Probyn
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EnglishUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK