Encyclopedia of Language and Education

2008 Edition
| Editors: Nancy H. Hornberger

Gendered Second Language Socialization

  • Daryl Gordon
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30424-3_209

Introduction

Despite the fact that gender is a central organizing principle in every culture and that conceptions of normative masculinities and femininities differ cross‐culturally, the role of gender identity in second language socialization has received insufficient attention. In 1994, Burton commented on the paucity of studies addressing the intersection of multilingualism and gender: “With a few notable exceptions, the considerable body of work on language and gender deals with monolingual situations, whatever the cultural context. In the literature on bilingualism, on the other hand, gender is hardly mentioned; here, it seems, is an area in which the experience of women is little documented” (1994, p. 1).

More than a decade later, an increasing number of studies have contributed to a more complex understanding of gender identity and its role in second language (L2) socialization within culturally heterogenous and multilingual settings. The perspective of gendered L2 socialization...

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© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daryl Gordon
    • 1
  1. 1.Darlyl GordonTemple UniversityUSBPhiladelphia