Encyclopedia of Machine Learning

2010 Edition
| Editors: Claude Sammut, Geoffrey I. Webb

Concept Learning

  • Claude Sammut
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30164-8_154

Synonyms

Definition

The term concept learning is originated in psychology, where it refers to the human ability to learn categories for object and to recognize new instances of those categories. In machine learning, concept is more formally defined as “inferring a boolean-valued function from training examples of its inputs and outputs” (Mitchell, 1997).

Background

Bruner, Goodnow, and Austin (1956) published their book A Study of Thinking, which became a landmark in psychology and would later have a major impact on machine learning. The experiments reported by Bruner, Goodnow, and Austin were directed toward understanding a human’s ability to categorize and how categories are learned.

We begin with what seems a paradox. The world of experience of any normal man is composed of a tremendous array of discriminably different objects, events, people, impressionsBut were we to utilize fully our capacity for registering the differences in things...

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Recommended Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claude Sammut

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