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Social Networks

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Introduction

Networks are pervasive in today’s world. They provide appropriate representations for systems comprised of individual agents interacting locally. Examples of such systems are urban regional transportation systems, national electrical power markets and grids, the Internet, ad-hoc communication and computing systems, public health, etc. According to Wikipedia, A social network is a social structure made of individuals (or organizations) called “nodes,” which are tied (connected) by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, kinship, financial exchange, dislike, sexual relationships, or relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige. Formally, a social network induced by a set V of agents is a graph G = (V, E), with an edge e = (u, v) ∈ E between individuals u and v, if they are interrelated or interdependent. Here, we use a more general definition of nodes and edges (that represent interdependency). The nodes represent living or virtual individuals....

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Khan, M., Kumar, V.S.A., Marathe, M.V., Stretz, P.E. (2011). Social Networks. In: Padua, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Parallel Computing. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-09766-4_163

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