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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Daniel F. Gros
  • Peter W. Tuerk
  • Matthew Yoder
  • Ron Acierno
Reference work entry

Abstract:

From its initial definition and frequent revisions in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, assessing and treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has presented many challenges to clinicians and researchers alike. However, through advances in cognitive and behavioral theory and practice, a number of evidence-based assessments (EBAs) and evidence-supported treatments (ESTs) have been developed to address this complex disorder. In this chapter, we briefly review the diagnostic features and EBA practices for PTSD. We also detail the mechanisms involved in the maintenance and treatment of PTSD and the EST approaches for the disorder. Finally, we outline the basic and expert clinician competencies involved in the treatment of PTSD from an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral perspective.

Keywords

Traumatic Event Ptsd Symptom Exposure Therapy Behavioral Avoidance Ptsd Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel F. Gros
    • 1
  • Peter W. Tuerk
    • 1
  • Matthew Yoder
    • 1
  • Ron Acierno
    • 1
  1. 1.Ralph H. Johnson VAMCCharlestonUSA

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