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Specific Phobia

  • Josh M. Cisler
  • Jeffrey M. Lohr
  • Craig N. Sawchuk
  • Bunmi O. Olatunji
Reference work entry

Abstract:

This chapter summarizes basic and expert clinical competencies in specific phobia. Familiarity with diagnostic nomenclature and use of behavioral approach tasks facilitate accurate assessment of specific phobia. The clinician should be familiar with basic processes maintaining specific phobia, such as the use of safety behaviors. Knowledge of exposure-based intervention protocols is mandatory. Expert clinical competencies include knowledge of procedures to augment exposure-based interventions as well and cultural influences in specific phobia. Mobilization of non-specific factors, conducting therapy outside of the consultation room, and collaborative problem solving with the client may facilitate the transition from basic to expert clinical competencies.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Panic Attack Specific Phobia Exposure Therapy Safety Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josh M. Cisler
    • 1
  • Jeffrey M. Lohr
    • 1
  • Craig N. Sawchuk
    • 2
  • Bunmi O. Olatunji
    • 3
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.University of Washington Medical CenterSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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