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Management and Administration

  • Philinda S. Hutchings
  • Deborah Lewis
  • Ruchi Bhargava
Reference work entry

Abstract:

Clinical psychology competencies in management and administration are often considered to develop in advanced stages of careers, but these competencies are developing at all stages. In addition, although management and administrative functions are often considered ancillary to the practice of clinical psychology and are not acquired through formal instruction, they are central to successful practice; regardless of skill in assessment and intervention, for example, the psychologist who does not perform well in the management and administrative functions of practice will have difficulties. Four areas of competency in management and administration are described; planning and organizing work; administration; leadership; and executive management. Planning and organizing work includes abilities to plan and organize tasks for self and for others, skills and activities in time management, professionalism, and adaptation to change. Administration includes knowledge and skills in business, marketing, and finance, organizational and community systems, ethical and legal policies and procedures, quality improvement, and information management. Leadership includes vision and mission development, skill in providing guidance and direction, and characteristics and attitudes appropriate for leadership in clinical psychology. Executive management includes skills in management of personnel and resources, provision of oversight, team development, and organization and systems management. The knowledge, skills, and activities within each of these areas are described and discussed at basic and advanced levels of competence.

Keywords

Leadership Style Business Plan Executive Management Leadership Competency Basic Competency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philinda S. Hutchings
    • 1
  • Deborah Lewis
    • 1
  • Ruchi Bhargava
    • 1
  1. 1.Midwestern UniversityGlendaleUSA

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