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Consultation

  • Jon Frew
Reference work entry

Abstract:

Not long ago the vast majority of clinical psychologists practiced in relatively restricted roles providing assessment and therapy services. There has been a pronounced shift in the field and today most psychologists are moving into expanded roles and activities. One of these roles is organizational consultation. In this chapter some of the requisite competencies to provide consultation services to organizations are outlined at both the basic and expert levels. As there is no uniformity or agreement about the number or definition of consultation competencies, a case study approach was employed to identify the range of competencies that were employed by the author in two organizational consulting projects.

Keywords

Clinical Psychologist Management Style Organizational Consultant Consult Psychology Basic Competency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon Frew
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific UniversityPortlandUSA

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