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Bypassing at Littoral Drift Barriers

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Part of the Encyclopedia of Earth Science Series book series (EESS)

Definition

A littoral drift barrier is an obstacle against the littoral drift or migration of material along the shore. Such barriers may be natural, for example, major headlands on the shore, or man-made such as jetties, breakwaters, or dredged channels, which established a hindrance for the normal drift of material along the shore.

Natural barriers may be responsible for major changes in the natural uninterrupted shore. The California saw-toothed headland shore is a large example of that. Bypassing is transportation of materials across the barrier, breaking the barrier-effect.

Bypassing by nature

Bypassing is the way that material, after a short interruption caused by an inlet, channel, jetty, or other kind of littoral barrier, is given back to the normal littoral drift zone a distance downdrift from the littoral barriers. If nature did not bypass sand across inlets, passes, and channels on seashores, many marine forelandsincluding barriers, spits, and entire peninsulas would not...

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Cross-references

  1. Barrier

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  2. Dredging of Coastal Environments

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  3. Littoral Cells

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  4. Longshore Sediment Transport

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  5. Navigation Structures

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  6. Tidal Prism

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© 2005 Springer

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Bruun, P. (2005). Bypassing at Littoral Drift Barriers. In: Schwartz, M.L. (eds) Encyclopedia of Coastal Science. Encyclopedia of Earth Science Series. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_58

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