Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Engineering Applications of Coastal Geomorphology

  • John R. C. Hsu
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_134

Coastal geomorphology

Literally, the title “geomorphology” comprises earth, shape and science with global aspects in that order. The study of earth science, from the strictly biblical concept of evolution to modern applied geomorphology, has been a long process in itself. In a generic term, geomorphology is indisputably a part of geology, but in institutional affiliation it has been a course in geography in almost all countries around the world. Coastal engineers have also contributed to its development in more recent time. Traditional geomorphology is concerned with the local landforms on the earth’s surface and their processes over time. Coastal geomorphology, as a branch within the traditional geomorphology, is a relatively new discipline. It explores the relationship between coastal landforms and their processes affected by factors associated with climatology, oceanography, fluid mechanics, sedimentation, and geophysics.

Before the World War II, geomorphology—including coastal...

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Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Artificial IslandsGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beach ErosionGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Beach FeaturesGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Beach NourishmentGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Coastal ChangesGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Coastal Processes (see Beach Processes)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Dynamic Equilibrium of BeachesGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Headland-Bay BeachGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    History, Coastal GeomorphologyGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Human Impact on CoastsGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Sandy CoastsGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Shore Protection StructuresGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. C. Hsu

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