Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Endogenic and Exogenic Factors

  • Henry Bokuniewicz
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_132

Endogenic (or endogenetic) factors are agents supplying energy for actions that are located within the earth. Endogenic factors have origins located well below the earth’s surface. The term is applied, for example, to volcanic origins of landforms, but it is also applied to the original chemical precipitates. Exogenic (or exogenetic) factors are agents supplying energy for actions that are located at or near the earth’s surface. Exogenic factors are usually driven by gravity or atmospheric forces. The term is commonly applied to various processes such as weathering, denudation, mass wasting, etc. In coastal science, these factors may be illustrated in two significant applications. One is the classification of coastlines and the other is the discussion of sea-level variations.

Factors in coastline classification

As early as 1885, Suess (as cited in Kennet, 1982) described the fundamental difference between the coastlines of the Atlantic and those of the Pacific Ocean. This distinction...

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Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Dietz, R.S., 1952. Geomorphic evolution of continental terrace (continental shelf and slope). Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 36: 1802–1819.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Inman, D.L., and Nordstrom, C.E., 1971. On the tectonic and morphological classification of coasts. Journal of Geology, 79: 1–21.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kennet, J.P., 1982. Marine Geology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
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    Shepard, F.P., 1963. Submarine Geology, 2nd edn. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Suess, E., 1885. Das Antlitz der Erde, I. Prague, F. Tempsky.Google Scholar

Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Barrier IslandsGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Changing Sea LevelsGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Faulted CoastsGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Holocene Coastal GeomorphologyGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Volcanic CoastsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry Bokuniewicz

There are no affiliations available